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Coronavirus (COVID-19) bei Krebspatienten

Aus gegebenem Anlass hat die Deutsche Gesellschaft für Hämatologie und Medizinische Onkologie (DGHO) eine Information für Patient*innen und Ärzt*innen zu Coronavirus-Krankheit 2019 (COVID-19) erstellt.

Bitte klicken Sie sich hier direkt zur DGHO.

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NUBs verfügbar

Die aktuellen Vorlagen für die NUBs sind verfügbar.

Herzlichen Dank gilt Herrn Prof. Dr. Michael Weichenthal für die Erstellung.

Hinweis: Für Substanzen, die in mehreren Indikationen zugelassen sind, stellt das Krankenhaus in der Regel einen zusammenfassenden Antrag, so dass die Anträge indikationsübergreifend sind.

Update für Encorafenib/Binimetinib: Anders als im bislang hinterlegten Entwurf angegeben, stehen pezifische OPS-Codes für Encorafenib und Binimetinib mit 6-00b.9 (Encorafenib, oral) bzw. 6-00b.2 (Binimetinib, oral) ab der 2020 gültigen Version zur Verfügung

 

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ADO Studientreffen 2019

Die Folien zum Studientreffen des Deutschen Hautkrebskongresses stehen nun zum Download zur Verfügung.

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Nationale Versorgungskonferenz Hautkrebs verabschiedet Ziele zur besseren Patientenversorgung bis 2021

Die Nationale Versorgungskonferenz Hautkrebs (NVKH) hat ihre Versorgungsziele 2017-2021 verabschiedet. Gemeinsam mit Patientenvertretern haben die beteiligten Fachgesellschaften und Verbände fünf nationale Versorgungsziele gegen den Hautkrebs definiert. Übergeordnetes Ziel ist es, die Prävention und Versorgung von Hautkrebs bundesweit zu verbessern.

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Methadon in der Krebstherapie

Seit April 2017 wurde in verschiedenen Medien über den Einsatz von Methadon bei Krebspatienten berichtet. Die Reaktionen sind enorm. Viele Patienten und ihre Angehörigen erkundigen sich nach den Möglichkeiten einer Methadontherapie. Die Deutsche Gesellschaft für Hämatologie und medizinische Onkologie (DGHO) hat nun eine Information für Patienten veröffentlicht. en.

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PubMed – Neue Publikationen

Outcomes of Immunosuppressed Patients Who Develop Melanoma: A Population-Based Propensity-Matched Cohort Study.

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Outcomes of Immunosuppressed Patients Who Develop Melanoma: A Population-Based Propensity-Matched Cohort Study.

Ann Surg Oncol. 2020 Apr 04;:

Authors: Austin J, Wright FC, Cheng SY, Sutradhar R, Baxter NN, Look Hong NJ

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Few studies have examined outcomes in immunosuppressed patients who develop melanoma. The purpose of this study is to compare survival in immunosuppressed patients who developed melanoma with that in patients with melanoma who are not immunosuppressed.
METHODS: Immunosuppressed patients were defined as having solid organ transplant, lymphoma, leukemia, or human immunodeficiency virus prior to diagnosis of melanoma. Patients with cutaneous melanoma with and without immunosuppression were identified retrospectively from the Ontario Cancer Registry (2007-2015) and linked with administrative databases to identify demographics, treatment, and outcomes. Immunosuppressed patients were matched with non-immunosuppressed patients based on age at diagnosis, sex, birth year, stage at diagnosis, and propensity score. The primary outcome was overall survival. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression was used to identify factors associated with survival.
RESULTS: Baseline characteristics were well balanced in 218 immunosuppressed patients matched to 436 controls. Of the patients, 186 (28.4%) were female, and median age at melanoma diagnosis was 69 (interquartile range, IQR 59-78) years. Three-year overall survival (OS) was 65% for immunosuppressed patients and 79% for non-immunosuppressed patients. Melanoma was the leading cause of death for both groups. On multivariable analysis, immunosuppression was associated with increased mortality [hazard ratio (HR) 1.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30-2.23]. Adequate treatment (HR 0.36, 95% CI 0.22-0.58) and dermatologist visits either before (HR 0.52, 95% CI 0.36-0.73) or after (HR 0.61, 95% CI 0.41-0.90) melanoma diagnosis were associated with improved OS.
CONCLUSIONS: Immunosuppressed patients who develop melanoma have worse outcomes when matched to non-immunosuppressed patients. This decrease in survival appears related to the underlying condition rather than diagnosis of melanoma.

PMID: 32248374 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

ASO Author Reflections: Primary Site Should Be Regarded as One Important Factor for Risk Stratification in Acral Melanoma.

Related Articles

ASO Author Reflections: Primary Site Should Be Regarded as One Important Factor for Risk Stratification in Acral Melanoma.

Ann Surg Oncol. 2020 Apr 04;:

Authors: Wei X, Si L, Guo J

PMID: 32248373 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

[MEK inhibitor-associated retinopathy under binimetinib treatment for cutaneous malignant melanoma].

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[MEK inhibitor-associated retinopathy under binimetinib treatment for cutaneous malignant melanoma].

Ophthalmologe. 2020 Apr 04;:

Authors: Groselli S, Heinrich D, Lohmann CP, Maier M

Abstract
The treatment options for patients with metastatic melanoma (MM) have been dramatically expanded in recent years with the approval of new drugs. The MEK (mitogen-acitvated protein kinase kinase) and BRAF (serine/threonine-protein kinase B-Raf coding gene) inhibitor combination therapy is currently part of the standard of care for stage IIIC/IV of BRAF mutant melanoma. The MEK inhibitor-associated retinopathy (MEKAR) is observed in patients with MM who are treated (or have been treated) with such a combination therapy. This article reports the case of a 72-year-old male patient, who suffered from such a pathological condition under treatment with binimetinib in combination with nivolumab. This case study illustrates the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration in the treatment of MM patients.

PMID: 32248296 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Hypericin photodynamic activity in DPPC liposomes - part II: stability and application in melanoma B16-F10 cancer cells.

Related Articles

Hypericin photodynamic activity in DPPC liposomes - part II: stability and application in melanoma B16-F10 cancer cells.

Photochem Photobiol Sci. 2020 Apr 05;:

Authors: de Morais FAP, Gonçalves RS, Vilsinski BH, Lazarin-Bidóia D, Balbinot RB, Tsubone TM, Brunaldi K, Vatatu Nakamura C, Hioka N, Caetano W

Abstract
Hypericin (Hyp) is considered a promising photosensitizer for Photodynamic Therapy (PDT), due to its high hydrophobicity, affinity for cell membranes, low toxicity and high photooxidation activity. In this study, Hyp photophysical properties and photodynamic activity against melanoma B16-F10 cells were optimized using DPPC liposomes (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) as a drug delivery system. This nanoparticle is used as a cell membrane biomimetic model and solubilizes hydrophobic drugs. Hyp oxygen singlet lifetime (τ) in DPPC was approximately two-fold larger than that in P-123 micelles (Pluronic™ surfactants), reflecting a more hydrophobic environment provided by the DPPC liposome. On the other hand, singlet oxygen quantum yield values (ΦΔ1O2) in DPPC and P-123 were similar; Hyp molecules were preserved as monomers. The Hyp/DPPC liposome aqueous dispersion was stable during fluorescence emission and the liposome diameter remained stable for at least five days at 30 °C. However, the liposomes collapsed after the lyophilization/rehydration process, which was resolved by adding the lyoprotectant Trehalose to the liposome dispersion before lyophilization. Cell viability of the Hyp/DPPC formulation was assessed against healthy HaCat cells and high-metastatic melanoma B16-F10 cells. Hyp incorporated into the DPPC carrier presented a higher selectivity index than the Hyp sample previously solubilized in ethanol under the illumination effect. Moreover, the IC50 was lower for Hyp in DPPC than for Hyp pre-solubilized in ethanol. These results indicate the potential of the formulation of Hyp/DPPC for future biomedical applications in PDT treatment.

PMID: 32248218 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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